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Staying Safe in the Sun

Posted by DianaYvonne on

The most important function of sunscreen is to reduce the amount of solar UV the skin receives, therefore protecting it from the damaging and potentially dangerous effects of UV radiation. An effective sunscreen must contain ingredients that absorb and reflect UV radiation before it can penetrate and damage the skin.

SPF (Sun Protection Factor) is a measure of protection against erythemally weighted UV, which includes UVA & UVB. An SPF number indicates protection against erythemally induced skin effects, such as redness and sunburn, which are weighted for UVB. Most consumers do not properly understand how SPF works. For Example, a sunscreen with SPF 15 will block 93% of erythemally weighted UV, whilst SPF 30 blocks 97%, certainly not double as a simple reading of the SPF factor could, to the uneducated, imply.

Conversely applying half of the effective dose of an SPF 30 will not result in an SPF 15, but more likely in an SPF 8.

SPFFraction of Burning

UV Transmitted

Time To

Sunburn

Burning UV

Blocked

4-4x75%
101/1010x90%
151/1515x93%
201/2020x95%
501/5050x98%

Currently there is no universal testing method for SPF or a standard product label to indicate the UVA level of protection. The United States Food & Drug Administration is due to release its proposal to address this shortcoming by setting new standards for testing and labeling of sunscreen products that claim to provide UVA & UVB sun protection. These label changes are likely to become effective in the year 2011.

The proposed regulations specify that SPF comes to mean “Sunburn Protection Factor”, rather than simply, Sun Protection Factor (which is only a measure of UVB efficacy). The labels on all sunscreen products will change dramatically with more information regarding the amount of times and frequency of the applications.

 SunScreen Spray The most important function of sunscreen is to reduce the amount of solar UV the skin receives, therefore protecting it from the damaging and potentially dangerous effects of UV radiation. An effective sunscreen must contain ingredients that absorb and reflect UV radiation before it can penetrate and damage the skin.

SPF (Sun Protection Factor) is a measure of protection against erythemally weighted UV, which includes UVA & UVB. An SPF number indicates protection against erythemally induced skin effects, such as redness and sunburn, which are weighted for UVB. Most consumers do not properly understand how SPF works. For Example, a sunscreen with SPF 15 will block 93% of erythemally weighted UV, whilst SPF 30 blocks 97%, certainly not double as a simple reading of the SPF factor could, to the uneducated, imply.

Conversely applying half of the effective dose of an SPF 30 will not result in an SPF 15, but more likely in an SPF 8.

SPFFraction of Burning

UV Transmitted

Time To

Sunburn

Burning UV

Blocked

4-4x75%
101/1010x90%
151/1515x93%
201/2020x95%
501/5050x98%

Currently there is no universal testing method for SPF or a standard product label to indicate the UVA level of protection. The United States Food & Drug Administration is due to release its proposal to address this shortcoming by setting new standards for testing and labeling of sunscreen products that claim to provide UVA & UVB sun protection. These label changes are likely to become effective in the year 2011.

The proposed regulations specify that SPF comes to mean “Sunburn Protection Factor”, rather than simply, Sun Protection Factor (which is only a measure of UVB efficacy). The labels on all sunscreen products will change dramatically with more information regarding the amount of times and frequency of the applications.

SunScreen Spray SPF, very light on the skin and my favorite.